Seriously Write: Quitting Is Not An Option by Betty Thomason Owens

Tags

, , , ,

Sandra Ardoin @SandraArdoin

Quitting is not an option. If you’re called to write, you have to write. You can’t quit. So get over it. Close that awful critique for a while. Don’t come back to it until you’re ready. How will you know when you’re ready?

On the Seriously Write blog, author Betty Thomason Owens provides encouragement for those writing times when you’re “curled up in a fetal position, seeking solace.”

SeriouslyWrite

Have you dealt with the thought quitting? What made you persevere?

 

 

 

Historical Flavor: Roller Coasters

Tags

, , ,

Sandra Ardoin @SandraArdoin

School is out and the amusement parks are packed with people looking for a thrill. Many find it with a heartstopping ride on a roller coaster. 

Did you know Coney Island in New York put the first American roller coaster to work? The Coney Island coaster opened in June of 1884. This “Switchback Railway” went a whopping six miles per hour. I can’t even imagine the excitement. 🙂 The craze began and the rides evolved in height, design, and speed up to about the era of the Great Depression. Hard times meant little money for those fun excursions.

The first steel-tube coaster opened at Disneyland in 1959. It’s been … ahem … a race up and down hill since. Carowinds Amusement Park, straddling the line between North and South Carolina, opened the largest giga coaster (one that reaches a height of 300+ feet) in 2015. The Fury 325 is a mile-and-a-quarter long, with a 300-foot drop, and can clock up to 95 miles per hour.

Oddly, the Fury 325 didn’t make the 2016 video below from Titan Top List that describes the five most extreme roller coasters worldwide. Just don’t watch it on a full stomach.

Are you a roller coaster rider? Do you have a favorite? Do you prefer the new giga coasters or the wooden coasters of the past?

 

Seriously Write: 3 Ideas for a Successful Book Launch by Kristen Hogrefe

Tags

, , , , , , ,

Sandra Ardoin @SandraArdoin

A myriad of writing resources talk about honing the craft, but fewer address how to prepare for a book launch. No matter our publishing path, the industry expects us writers to play a leading role in spreading the word about our books.

Join Kristen Hogrefe on the Seriously Write blog as she provides three tips for launching your new book. While you’re there, share your experience. 

SeriouslyWrite

Do you have any tips to add for launching a book into the marketplace?

Book Review: If I’m Found by Terri Blackstock

Tags

, , , , , , ,

Sandra Ardoin @SandraArdoin

If I’m Found, Terri Blackstock’s second book in the If I Run series, is out and continues the story of Casey Cox’s escape from capture by those who have no interest in seeing her jailed for a crime she didn’t commit. They want her dead.

Dylan Roberts is a former soldier dealing with PTSD. He’s also a private investigator, hoping to get on with the Shreveport, Louisiana police department. Dylan is hired by the parents of the victim—a friend of both Dylan and Casey—to help the police track down and capture Casey. After communicating with her and digging into the evidence, he’s convinced she’s being set up … and he knows who’s doing it.

I’m not generally one to prefer first-person, present-tense narrative, but when swept up in an absorbing story with characters to root for, it fades into the background. I thoroughly enjoyed the first book, If I Run (see my review here), so it was a no-brainer to pick up the second novel. If I’m Found starts right where the first book ended, almost as though the whole story was written, then sliced up into sections, which leads me to my one issue….

As a writer, I understand not wanting to include a backstory dump. However, with the length of time between the release of the two books (and several novel reads in between), I found myself struggling to remember the details of the first story. I would have liked a little more of that backstory—the key points—in the first couple chapters to become more grounded in the story, rather than dribbled out a tiny bit at a time throughout the book. 

That said, the characters are appealing and sympathetic—Casey’s compassionate willingness to risk her safety for the welfare of someone else and Dylan’s drive to save a woman he’s never met from injustice and certain death. The villains are nasty and, at one point in the story, their deeds produced a heartbreaking result. As for the faith element, Casey must realize that her only true escape is found in running straight to God. 

If you haven’t read the first book, grab it, then pick up If I’m Found. But do NOT read them out of order! 🙂

How do you feel about a series involving a continuing story with one or two main characters? Do you prefer a series of stand-alone novels? With a continuing series, do you prefer to wait until all the books have released before reading them?

 

Seriously Write: Dealing With Publishing Disappointments by Lynn Huggins Blackburn

Tags

, , , , , ,

Sandra Ardoin @SandraArdoin

We’ve heard it before . . . If there’s one thing you can count on in publishing, it’s change. Sigh.

I’m no fan of change, but I’ve found a few things that help me deal with the inevitable disappointments that come my way.

On the Seriously Write blog: Three tips for dealing with those publishing disappointments from author Lynn Huggins Blackburn.

SeriouslyWrite

Have you encountered an unexpected shift in your writing journey? How do you manage the ever-changing publishing world?