SandraArdoin

The second book in Lynette Eason’s Elite Guardians series is out with a nail-biting beginning. I alluded to it in my review of the first book Always Watching.

Without Warning introduces the reader to another member of the mostly female team of bodyguards, Katie Singleton. Katie is a former member of an ATF explosives squad who left the organization after a personal tragedy. In this story, she and her co-workers must protect Daniel Matthews and his teen-aged, orphaned niece from an arsonist and possible murderer.

Daniel was no stranger to death. He’d seen plenty of it during his three tours in the Middle East. He’d even been a target before, simply because of his country of birth. But this was different. This was personal. And the sinking feeling in his gut said it had only just begun.

Like any of Ms. Eason’s books, this one flies with can’t-put-it-down action and strong characters who must sort through both professional and personal concerns until the end. In this case, the hero (a former Marine) and the heroine battle PTSD. 

Just as with the first book, for me, this story didn’t quite reach the sky-high enjoyment level I’ve experienced with some of the author’s previous books. Then again, that’s a high mark to reach.

While I liked Daniel and his devotion to his niece, Riley, there were times his attitude got on my nerves and took me out of the story. He’s protective, yes, and in many ways appealing, but definitely the alpha-male type who can’t stand by and let others do their jobs. In one scene especially, I wanted to hold my palm out and, in a firm voice, say, “Stay!”

Given all that happens, I’m not sure the Elite Guardians should use this case as a reference on the company resume :), but the incitement for the terrible deeds is interesting, and the climax itself is a page-turner.

Even with my minor issues, I can say the stakes are raised with every hint and incident of danger, and you’ll want to make sure Without Warning is added to your to-read list ASAP. Then keep an eye out for Moving Target, releasing next spring.

In a romantic suspense, it’s not uncommon to know the antagonist from the start (not the case in this book). Do you prefer the antagonist to be a complete mystery—maybe, a good twist at the end—or is all that matters how he/she goes about trying to defeat the good guy?

 

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