Tags

, ,

Isabelle had always envisioned Charlie Hamilton as the hero depicted in the romantic tapestry hanging in the Hamilton home. Then Charlie abandoned her to make decisions no one should make alone. Now, six years later, Charlie’s back, and despite Isabelle’s best efforts, she can’t ignore the longing his presence reignites. Charlie wants a second chance, but can Isabelle trust the man he’s become? Can she surrender her threadbare heart long enough for God to weave Isabelle’s own happily-ever-after tapestry?

        

               

In Mary Anslee Urban’s debut novel Tapestry of Trust, we meet Isabelle Crafton and Charlie Hamilton, a young couple in need of emotional healing and, as the title suggests, recapturing trust.

Isabelle, a teacher, has never gotten over the consequences of her love for Charlie, which has affected her desire to move forward with other relationships. She’s content with her life the way it is now.

In a moment of weakness, Charlie failed Isabelle when she needed him most. But when she disappeared without answering his letters, he chose to move ahead with his ambitions, both in work and play.

Years later, the story starts when a deaf cat brings them together and, though Charlie wants to renew their relationship, Isabelle can’t get past his abandonment. Both have become Christians, but finding forgiveness is difficult.

Tapestry of Trust is a pleasant read, one of those books with an “Ahhh…” ending. Yet, the nitty-gritty of Charlie and Isabelle’s past story is one that, in some ways, surprised me and tugged on those emotional heartstrings. I don’t want to give too much away, so I won’t say more.

If it has a drawback, I think it comes from a rush in bringing the Happy Ever After at the end. Yes, we know all along they’re in love, but there’s not as much “romantic” time between them as some readers of formula romance might prefer. However, in my mind, the story revolves more around their past heartbreak and their efforts to heal, which made for good reading.

The novel releases today and is one to add to your summer reading list.

So, what books are on your summer reading list? Do you prefer light reads in summer and something a little heavier in winter? Or does it matter?

          

Disclosure of Material Connection: This book came to me free from White Rose Publishing with the hope that I would mention it on this blog. There was no requirement for me to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed above are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Advertisements